Of course, the address itself won't be enough to estimate the value of a home. It just denotes the home's neighborhood. That's why the next page follows with more questions about the property itself, like number of beds and baths. Below, you see the copy "Tell us where to send the report" -- with a disclaimer that, by entering this information, you're agreeing to connect with a real estate agent. This is a great example of a company giving value to their visitors from the get-go, while setting visitors' expectations about what will happen as a result.
It's no surprise Unbounce is near the top of this list -- they've actually written the book on creating high-converting landing pages. Although there are lots of amazing things about this landing page, the two that I absolutely love are: 1) The use of a chat window instead of a classic form, and 2) the detailed -- but well packaged -- information below the form.
Of course, implementing this isn't easy. You need to first develop your stories, then decide on how you're going to convey those stories and at what drip-rate. For example, your first email or two might go out on the day they first signup, then one email per day might go out afterwards. How much of that will be story-based and how much will be pitches?
In a recent conversation I had with Perry Belcher, co-founder of Native Commerce Media, he told me that you also need to train your prospects to click on links. For example, you could have them click on a link of what interests them or link them to a blog post or eventually to a product or service that you're selling, but you need to train them to build a habit of clicking on those links from the very beginning.
The metaphor of the funnel is used because people drop away at each stage of a long sales process: for example, many of your unqualified prospects may have existing suppliers with whom they're very satisfied. Others may have needs which other competitors are better-placed to satisfy. Still, others may love your products, but not have the budget to buy them.
Whimsical isn't usually the first word that comes to mind when you think of HR software, but Teambit's illustration-heavy landing page is exactly that. A simple, one-field form is accompanied by a delightful office full of animal characters -- all of whom are very pleased with Teambit, in case you were wondering. An animal cartoon appears beside each informational section of the landing page, keeping visitors scrolling down to learn more.
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